A Brand New Start – NY Resolutions

A Brand New Start – NY Resolutions

Happy New Year Everybody!! I just love the fresh, vibrant new energy that the beginning of a shiny New Year brings. The dawn of 2014 was particularly special as January 1st also coincided with the New Moon – the ideal moon phase for new beginnings. A New Year gives us an opportunity to… redefine our priorities redefine our purpose redefine our life’s vision re-establish worthwhile goals (don’t waste your time on goals if they don’t take you towards your vision – don’t be afraid to scratch a few things off the list!) bury the past and move into a future that we haven’t created yet – leave your baggage in 2013 Concluding our lap around the sun is the perfect opportunity to not only set new goals for the New Year, but also a great time to pause and reflect. Looking back on 2013 and recalling lessons you may have learnt, as well as goals you’ve ticked off the list, provides a great foundation from which to prepare for a Brand New Year. Take Time to Reflect on 2013 So looking back on 2013, whether it was wonderful, awful, or somewhere in between – there will be pieces of gold hidden in the days and months gone past. So what did you achieve in 2013?  What did you do well? Grab a piece of paper and write three columns: Practical Goals Achieved Internal Growth Achieved What I loved most about 2013 e.g. graduated a course e.g. learnt how to say no e.g. becoming a parent e.g. completed a 5km fun run e.g. conquered your fear of heights   e.g....
Vitamin C – RDA increase proposed

Vitamin C – RDA increase proposed

Researchers Recommend Increase in Vitamin C Dietary Allowance Scientists at Oregon State University’s Linus Pauling Institute are proposing an increase in the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for vitamin C from the current level of 90 milligrams per day for men and 75 milligrams for women, to a modest intake of 200 milligrams. Writing in a recent issue of Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, Professor Balz Frei and colleagues observe that the current RDA is based on the amount necessary to prevent scurvy and that present methods of evaluating nutrients such as vitamin C have often failed to find further disease-preventive benefits due to faulty methodology. “Phase III randomised controlled trials—designed principally to test the safety and efficacy of pharmaceutical drugs—are ill suited to assess the health benefits of essential nutrients; and the currently available scientific evidence is sufficient to determine the optimum intake of vitamin C in humans,” they write. “It’s time to bring some common sense to this issue, look at the totality of the scientific evidence, and go beyond some clinical trials that are inherently flawed,” commented Dr Frei, who is the director of the Linus Pauling Institute. “Significant numbers of people in the U.S. and around the world are deficient in vitamin C, and there’s growing evidence that more of this vitamin could help prevent chronic disease. The way clinical researchers study micronutrients right now, with the same type of so-called ‘phase three randomised placebo-controlled trials’ used to test pharmaceutical drugs, almost ensures they will find no beneficial effect. We need to get past that.” Dr Frei and his coauthors argue that these trials...

“Those who think they have not time for bodily exercise will sooner or later have to find time for illness”

~ Edward Stanley

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Berries Delay Brain Ageing

Berries Delay Brain Ageing

An article published online on April 26, 2012 in the Annals of Neurology reports a protective effect for diets containing high amounts of blueberries and strawberries against cognitive decline in older women. Berries are high in compounds known as flavonoids, which may help reduce the negative impact of inflammation and stress on cognitive function. “As the U.S. population ages, understanding the health issues facing this group becomes increasingly important,” commented lead researcher Elizabeth Devore of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. “Our study examined whether greater intake of berries could slow rates of cognitive decline.” Dr Devore and her associates evaluated data from women who were between the ages of 30 and 55 upon enrollment in the Nurses’ Health Study in 1976. Dietary questionnaires completed every four years since 1980 were analyzed for the frequency of berry intake as well as the intake of 31 individual flavonoids representing six major flavonoid subclasses commonly found in US diets. Cognitive function was tested every two years in 16,010 participants who were over the age of 70 between 1995 and 2001. Consuming a relatively high amount of blueberries or strawberries was associated with a slower decline in cognitive function test scores over the follow-up period compared to women whose intake was lower, resulting in a delay in cognitive aging of up to 2.5 years. Greater intake of the anthocyanidin class of flavonoids and total flavonoids was also associated with a reduced rate of decline. “Substantial biologic evidence supports our finding that berry and flavonoid intake may be related to cognition,” the authors write. “Berry-derived anthocyanidins are uniquely and specifically capable...