Why ‘BPA-free’ might just be… B.S.

Why ‘BPA-free’ might just be… B.S.

For those of us who are conscious of the endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) found in plastics – we know that bisphenol-A (BPA) is a xenooestrogen and can have a negative effect on our health. But if you’ve not yet heard about BPA, or have no idea about what an EDC is – let me fill you in. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are mostly man-made, found in various materials such as pesticides, metals, additives or contaminants in food, and personal care products. And BPA is just one of them. Close to 800 chemicals are known or suspected to be capable of interfering with hormone receptors, hormone synthesis or hormone conversion – but only a fraction of those chemicals have been investigated. United Nations agencies have warned that the disease risk due to EDCs may have been significantly under-estimated. The UN Environment (UNEP) and World Health Organisation (WHO) are aware of their link to early breast development, poor semen quality, low birthweight in babies and rising cancer rates and have called for more research. If you’re interested you can find the full report here. BPA is BAD   BPA is one of the more publicised EDCs and was first recognised to have oestrogenic activity (hence the label ‘xenooestrogen’) like a synthetic drug in 1936 long before it was used to form polycarbonate plastic and resins in the early 1950s. Interest and concern about the health effects of BPA have been growing, following reports that the health effects seen in exposed animals are also on the rise in humans. These include breast and prostate cancer, regional decline in sperm counts, abnormal penile/urethra development in males,...
Dissolve a Headache With Water

Dissolve a Headache With Water

Drinking Water may Dissolve a Headache Drinking water should be considered as a first line intervention for chronic headaches, researchers in Holland suggest. Their study compared two groups of patients with recurring headaches who consumed less than 2.5 litres of water per day. The researchers advised 52 patients to increase their water intake by 1.5 litres per day over three months, while 50 patients acted as a control group. All patients were issued advice on stress reduction and sleep improvement strategies, and tracked their water consumption, and experience of headaches in daily diaries. Almost half (47%) of the headache patients who increased their water intake reported much improvement compared to just a quarter of the control group, according to patient ratings of their self-perceived effect of treatment. Drinking more water also resulted in statistically significant improvement of 4.5 points on a Migraine Specific Quality Of Life (MSQOL) score, researchers report. However, drinking water had no effect on the frequency or duration of headaches. “Considering the observed positive subjective effects, it seems reasonable to recommend headache patients to try this non-invasive intervention for a short period of time to see whether they experience improvement,” say the researchers from the Department of General Practice at Maastricht University, writing in the journal Family Practice.   “The advice to increase the daily water intake could be a feasible first step intervention for patients with headache,” they say. [Source: 6...