Is Winter-Dry Skin Driving You Crazy? Omega-7 Is The Answer!

Is Winter-Dry Skin Driving You Crazy? Omega-7 Is The Answer!

  Essential fatty acids (EFAs) are known to be beneficial for, amongst other things, skin health. And when it comes to EFAs, omega-3 and omega-6 are usually top of mind. You may even know about omega-9. But most people have never heard of omega-7, let alone know how good it is for the skin! Omega-7 (also called ‘palmitoleic acid’ in most scientific and clinical publications) is a rare but powerful monounsaturated fat (MUFA) that can be found in animal and plant sources, including macadamia nuts, cold-water fish and sea buckthorn seeds and berries. Sea buckthorn contains the highest concentration of this valuable fatty acid, up to 40% as compared to 17% in macadamia nuts. And whilst I’m going to touch on some of the numerous skin and health benefits, it is also known for its ability to support a healthy weight, as well as cardiovascular and gastro-intestinal health. Sea Buckthorn What makes sea buckthorn so intriguing is its unique composition of numerous nutrients, including omega-7. It’s a rich source of vitamins, minerals, amino acids, vitamin C, vitamin E, and carotenoids. Several sources have placed its combined bioactive substances at 190 for the berries, of which 106 of these are found in the oil alone. Although the fruits of sea buckthorn have been used as a remedy by traditional Tibetan and Mongolian medicine since ancient times, according to Oriental history, the Chinese were the first culture to utilise this berry as a drug. In 1977 this plant was formally listed in the Chinese pharmacopoeia by the Ministry of Public Health. Sea buckthorn’s pharmacological effects were recorded in some 1000-year old medicinal classics, such as the Yue Wang Yao and Sibu Yidian...
Eating Fruit And Vegetables Increases Your Attractiveness

Eating Fruit And Vegetables Increases Your Attractiveness

So it turns out eating fruit and vegetables increases your attractiveness… and I don’t just mean you look great sitting there eating your salad. Beauty, or others perception of your beauty, is linked to your fruit and vegetable consumption! We all know that eating fruit and vegetables are good for health, energy and vitality – and that good nutrition and beauty are related. But now research from University of St. Andrews (UK) demonstrates that fruit and vegetable intake is associated with healthy glowing skin. In this study[1], the scientists followed the dietary patterns of students over a period of six weeks: These students filled out food frequency questionnaires which provided data around fruit and vegetable consumption (no offence to potatoes but they were not counted as vegetables in this study) They recorded the change in skin colour and compared perceived attractiveness among these students At the end of the study, they found that students who ate more fruits and vegetables had a healthy golden skin. On the contrary, students who reduced the amount of fruits and vegetables they ate looked less attractive by the end of the study. NB: there was no make-up allowed, or tanning of any sort. How Much Do I Need To Eat? You don’t have to double your fruit and vegetable intake to achieve this either. Adding just 2-3 extra portions had a noticeable effect on attractiveness within a period of six weeks. Researchers determined: eating an additional 2.91 portions per day would make you look healthy eating an additional 3.3 portions of fruits and vegetables would make you look attractive On average, one portion of...
Fermented Foods – Skin Friend or Skin Foe?

Fermented Foods – Skin Friend or Skin Foe?

In recent times there has been a huge increase in awareness of how important gut health is, and when it comes to skin – gut health is everything. And with this increase in awareness there has been a subsequent rise in consumption of fermented foods like sauerkraut, kim chi, kefir, kombucha and yoghurt. Fermented foods are a great, whole food source of probiotic bacteria and, in turn, their benefits to our insides. But did you know they might be doing your skin more harm than good…? Let me explain… If your gut is already in pretty good nick, fermented foods will only add to the health and wellbeing of your microbiome – and this will be good for your skin. However. If your gut is compromised in any way, consuming fermented foods may make your skin worse. This is because fermented foods are one of the biggest dietary sources of histamines. An intolerance to, an excess of, or issues with metabolism of histamine frequently can express itself on the surface of the skin through a number of symptoms, including but not limited to hives, eczema, rosacea and acne[1]. This is called histamine intolerance[2]. In one study[3] researchers found that a histamine-free diet improved a number of allergic conditions and, upon reintroducing histamine-containing foods there was a clearcut recurrence of eczema in half of the patients affected! No surprises then that a study found higher histamine levels aggravated eczema[4], and another[5] found that some atopic eczema patients had lower levels of a key enzyme that metabolises histamine – diamine oxidase. In the case of acne I see patients who present...